Cards Lose Broderick, Take Mijares in Rule 5

Brian Broderick

Brian Broderick moves to Washington while St. Louis picks minor league left-hander Juan Mijares in the Rule 5 draft.

Coming off a 2010 season during which he led the entire St. Louis Cardinals minor league system with 14 victories, pitcher Brian Broderick is leaving the organization. The right-hander was selected by the Washington Nationals in the second round of the 2010 Rule 5 Draft. The event was held on Thursday morning in Orlando, Florida.

The Cardinals receive $50,000 in return. Broderick will need to make the Nationals' 25-man roster in the spring or be placed on waivers. If claimed by another organization, he would need to remain on their roster. If he clears, the Cardinals can take him back for $25,000.

The Cardinals made no selections in the Major League phase of the draft and lost no other players Thursday. Among the 41 others eligible but not selected were Nick Stavinoha, Daryl Jones and Adam Ottavino.

Broderick, 24, was drafted in the 21st round of the 2007 draft (652nd overall) from Grand Canyon College in Arizona. He first reached Double-A Springfield for a month in the summer of 2009. Broderick began 2010 at A-Advanced Palm Beach before being recalled to Springfield at the end of May.

He got out of the gates quickly in the Texas League, earning the circuit's Pitcher of the Week for the period of May 31 through June 6. He replaced an injured Scott Gorgen on the Texas League mid-season All-Star roster and following the season was named The Cardinal Nation/Scout.com Springfield Starting Pitcher of the Year.

Broderick received additional exposure when selected to pitch for the Surprise Rafters in the 2010 Arizona Fall League. He was designed as St. Louis' member of the Rafters' rotation.

With six starts, the 6-foot-6 right-hander was just one off the AFL lead and he typically went deep into games with his 26 2/3 innings tying for the most in the league. Broderick had three wins, a loss and a pair of no-decisions. His best starts were his first and his last, with the latter a two-hit shutout over five innings.

Overall, his 4.29 ERA was almost smack dab in the center of the league qualifiers. Much of that damage occurred via the long ball as Broderick yielded five home runs, almost one per start, third-most in the league. He continued a pattern of striking out few while minimizing walks, with the result a strikeout to walk ratio that again placed him in the middle of the AFL pack.

In the Triple-A phase of the draft, the Cardinals did make one selection in an area I predicted they would, left-handed pitching. They selected Jean Mijares from the Minnesota Twins. The 22 year-old native of Venezuela pitched in the Appalachian League in 2010.

Slight of build at 5-foot-11, 149 pounds, Mijares fanned 45 batters in 33 2/3 innings and walked 17 this past summer. He had a 1.52 ground-to-fly ball ratio, held opposing hitters to a collective .195 average and posted a 2.67 ERA. Mijares worked in relief all summer prior to two end-of-season starts.

Mijares has five years of professional experience since first signing in August 2005 as a 17-year-old. He began play in 2006, when he split his time between the Venezuelan and Dominican Summer Leagues. He returned to the VSL in 2007 before two seasons in the Gulf Coast League.

There are no roster restrictions on how the Cardinals use Mijares in 2011, so he should remain in the organization. Where he starts the season will depend on how he performs in spring training.

The Cardinals lost no players in the minor league segment of this year's draft. Overall, 47 players changed organizations on Thursday.



Brian Walton can be reached via email at brian@thecardinalnationblog.com. Also catch his Cardinals commentary daily at The Cardinal Nation blog. Selected TCN content appears at FOXSportsMidwest.com. Follow Brian on Twitter.

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